Selected materials on environmental aspects of staphylococcal disease, January 1959.
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Selected materials on environmental aspects of staphylococcal disease, January 1959.

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Published in Atlanta .
Written in English


Book details:

The Physical Object
Paginationxv, 289 p.
Number of Pages289
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17038341M
OCLC/WorldCa14608525

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17th St. at Livingston Park, Columbus 5, Ohio Certain Aspects of the Treatment of Staphylococcal Infections Warren E. Wheeler, M.D. Department of Pediatrics, the Ohio State University, and The Children’s Hospital, Columbus. Department of Pediatrics, the Ohio State University, and The Children’s Hospital Columbus. REFERENCES by: 4. Selected Staphylococcal Diseases. Staphylococcus aureus is a common colonizer of human skin and may be found in the anterior nose of up to 30% of asymptomatic persons. It is among the most common causes of skin and soft tissue infections. In Georgia, only certain staphylococcal infections are notifiable conditions. Abstract. In contrast to the well-established pathogenStaphylococcus aureus, the coagulase-negative staphylococci, formerly collectively calledS. epidermidis, were until recently regarded as harmless the last two decades, however, the coagulase-negative staphylococci have clearly emerged as pathogens in patients carrying artificial devices, such as prosthetic heart valves Cited by: The Staphylococcal Toxins in Human Disease. Abstract. The staphylococci are involved in many human illnesses and infections, including staphylococcal food poisoning, enterocolitis, pneumonia, sep-ticemia, osteomyelitis, diarrhea, empyema, scalded skin syndrome (SSS), toxic shock syndrome (TSS), boils, infected wounds, and infected by: 2.

The frequency of occurrence of epidemics of staphylococcal disease in healthy newborn infants, however, suggests that this age group is highly susceptible to staphylococcal disease. The factors responsible for this susceptibility are not by: Enterotoxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus are responsible for staphylococcal food-poisoning outbreaks (SFPO). In France, SFPO are the second cause of food-borne diseases after Salmonella. Prepare review papers on selected topics in which the multinational contribution would strengthen the validity and impact; Co- organizing sessions at relevant conferences, e.g. 12th International Meeting on Microbial Epidemiological Markers (IMMEM) and 19th International Symposium on Staphylococci and Staphylococcal Infections (ISSSI)   Localized infection of the bone is called osteomyelitis. Serious consequences of staphylococcal infections occur when the bacteria invade the blood stream. A resulting septicemia may be rapidly fatal; a bacteremia may result in seeding other internal abscesses, other skin lesions, or infections in the lung.

MURRAY WA, Jr, McDANIEL GE, REED M. Evaluation of the phone survey in an outbreak of staphylococcal infections in a hospital nursery for the newborn. Am J Public Health Nations Health. Mar; 48 (3)–Cited by: 7. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (M), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. Links to PubMed are also available for Selected by: 8. Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive, round-shaped bacterium that is a member of the Firmicutes, and it is a usual member of the microbiota of the body, frequently found in the upper respiratory tract and on the skin. It is often positive for catalase and nitrate reduction and is a facultative anaerobe that can grow without the need for : Bacilli. Staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP) is caused by staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs) preformed in food materials. SE genes are encoded on mobile genetic elements and are widely found across.